You’ve probably heard along the way that there is good stress (the kind that motivates you) and bad stress (the kind that paralyzes you).

dating at the workplace-66dating at the workplace-45

" The only thing she disagreed with was a sentence that read: "When Shana observes without commenting, others may think she isn't interested or engaged." "I have never ever thought that," my coworker wrote.

"You always seem to be processing and internalizing everything that's going on." The questionnaire I'd taken was a product of Neuro Color, a company co-founded by Helen Fisher and David Labno in 2013.

A few weeks ago, several of my coworkers received an email from me with a somewhat awkward request.

I'd just completed a personality questionnaire, I told them, and I wanted to know if the results were accurate.

Cacioppo acknowledged being a "paid scientific advisor" for the website, but said the researchers followed procedures provided by the Journal of the American Medical Association and agreed to oversight by independent statisticians.

People who reported meeting their spouse online tended to be age 30-49 and of higher income brackets than those who met their spouses offline, the survey found.Among couples who were still married during the survey, those who met online reported higher marital satisfaction -- an average score of 5.64 on a satisfaction survey -- than those who met offline and averaged 5.48.The lowest satisfaction rates were reported by people who met through family, work, bars/clubs or blind dates.Fisher is a biological anthropologist at Rutgers University and a leading expert on the science of love and relationships.The compatibility questionnaire on dating site Match, which has now been taken by upwards of 14 million people across the globe, is her handiwork.This article looks beyond the first heady weeks of office romance and gets down the nitty gritty.