It was identified as the world's oldest marijuana stash.

A couple of flutes made from bird bone and mammoth ivory came from Hohle Fels Cave in Germany, which contains early evidence of the occupation of Europe by modern humans, or Homo sapiens.

Scientists used carbon dating to show that the flutes were between 42,000 and 43,000 years old.

The development in the 1970s of new techniques for radio-carbon dating, which required much lower quantities of source material, prompted the Catholic Church to found the Shroud of Turin Research Project (S. Also present were Cardinal Ballestrero, four priests, archdiocese spokesperson Luigi Gonella, photographers, a camera operator, Michael Tite of the British Museum, and the labs' representatives.

group initially planned to conduct a range of different studies on the cloth, including radio-carbon dating. The six labs that showed interest in performing the procedure fell into two categories, according to the method they utilised: In 1982, the S. The blind-test method was abandoned because the distinctive three-to-one herringbone twill weave of the shroud could not be matched in the controls, and a laboratory could thus identify the shroud sample.

Nearby, workers also uncovered an assortment of thick and heavily fossilized bones.

In succeeding years many further specimens have been found, not only in the German Neander Valley, but in with rickets, caused by a deficiency of vitamin D.It is generally believed that Neolithic people found that by chewing this stuff if they had gum infections it helped to treat the condition," said Trevor Brown from the University of Derby.(Source) "It is astonishing how much this shoe resembles a modern shoe! Stuffed with grass, perhaps as an insulator or an early shoe tree, the 5,500-year-old moccasin-like shoe was found exceptionally well preserved—thanks to a surfeit of sheep dung—during a 2010 dig in an Armenian cave. S.), the shoe was likely tailor-made for the right foot of its owner. C., during Armenia's Copper Age, the prehistoric shoe is compressed in the heel and toe area, likely due to miles upon miles of walking. (Source) In 2012, researchers identified what they say are the oldest-known musical instruments in the world. lack of blindness in the measurements is a rather insubstantial reason for disbelieving the result." (t)he Church must respond to the challenge of those who want it to stop the process, who would want us to show that the Church fears the science. that radiocarbon measurements on the shroud should be performed blind seem to the author to be lacking in merit; …In 1988, scientists at three separate laboratories dated samples from the Shroud to a range of 1260–1390 AD, which coincides with the first certain appearance of the shroud in the 1350s and is much later than the burial of Jesus around 30 AD. Samples were taken on April 21, 1988, in the Cathedral by Franco Testore, an expert on weaves and fabrics, and by Giovanni Riggi, a representative of the maker of bio-equipment "Numana".